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June 02, 2007

Comments

vic

Lots of things a foreigner can not do in the Philippines, but yet very easy to hire a dummy as proxy.

We have long ago invented discrimination and perfected it, while others have almost eliminated it. We are on the Reverse mode...

Tom

Its called protectionism and, sparing everyone a long argument on how closed markets help keep alive inefficient businesses, the whole thing is basically shortsighted.

torn

I would be interested to know whether the provision about the professions (see next post) was retained in the version of the constitution that was drafted last year. Presumably it was, given the power of legal and medical lobbies (and given that many legislators are lawyers themselves).

Major Tom

I was a law student before and studied this particular constitutional provision but in my mind, this equity limitation is a vestige of an old system, very protective and could stifling in the long run.
If more fireigners could be allowed to do on more forms of businesses here, it would surely help more dollar circulation in our country in great folds, and that's a good thing for our economy.

Cogs

One single legislative change could improve so much in the Philippines. Let's lift the law banning overseas control of media outlets.

Let's invite American, British or Hong Kong media investors to fight for the largest English-reading population outside India (and maybe including India, for all I know). And then let's see what happens.

Gone would be the incestuous and stifling relationship between the Star management/the Inquirer owners/the powerful TV stations and the Establishment.

Gone would be the local media's shoddy policy of "if you're powerful, we'll print your press releases without checking them and without caring too much whether you are lying or not as long as the content is interesting."

The Philippines should let imported Fleet Street reporters loose on the dynasties and their connections to Malacanang. Hong Kong-style reporters should be given licence to go after Singson and his ilk.

Public officials living way above their means should be followed, photographed with their fancy homes and their expensive cars and then asked to explain themselves on the front page.

Anybody know why the powerful are so reluctant to change the laws governing the media?

cvj

If we invited in the likes of Rupert Murdoch's Fox News, i think we will find that they would be the first ones to kow-tow to the ones in power whoever they may be. Fox News is Republican in the US, but Murdoch also supports the Chinese Communist Establishment in China. They will do this because they would not want their license to expire or get cancelled like what has happened to RCTV in Venezuela.

vic

There are institutions that are worth protecting that could not be opened for foreign nationals.

For many many years, banking in Canada is only opened to Chartered Canadian banks to accept deposits from the Canadian Public, because of the Unique Law, that Chartered Bank ownership can't be owned or held by one single person or entity with the holding of more than 10%. That is to protect the public from one person or entity controlling the interest of the Bank. The reason why the Chartered banks has been the pillars of our Financial Institutions. But other than that, especially with our neighbor to the south, and with NAFTA, just about everything have some kind of reciprocity.

Pedestrian Observer

Is it about protecting the national interest or protecting the interest of the ruling minority?

Until we see a level political playing field it is to expected that laws are crafted to protect the interest of those who control the industries that are in turn one way or the other linked to those who hold political power in the Philippines.

Nick

Hi,

I’m doing a writing project regarding the recent murder of Musa Dimasidsing, the district supervisor who was shot dead, he was the election official who exposed the election fraud and other anomalies in Maguindanao.

I hope you can join the the writing project and write a blog post on your reaction, I will link to your post, and I will collect the links everyday and post them up on a single blog post. This starts Wednesday up until Sunday.

You can read about the writing project on my recent post and also find out how you can join. I hope everyone can join, and let’s make our voices heard, let’s stand up for the heroism of Musa and hope that his death does not go in vain.

Mila

How come Colin of Sala and People's Palace fame can own a restaurant or two? Or does he simply "manage" it? Perhaps you and Frayed need to talk to him to find out how it is done. I'll pass on the nut roast, but do some nice salads!

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